MediaWiki API result

This is the HTML representation of the JSON format. HTML is good for debugging, but is unsuitable for application use.

Specify the format parameter to change the output format. To see the non-HTML representation of the JSON format, set format=json.

See the complete documentation, or the API help for more information.

{
    "batchcomplete": "",
    "warnings": {
        "main": {
            "*": "Subscribe to the mediawiki-api-announce mailing list at <https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/mediawiki-api-announce> for notice of API deprecations and breaking changes."
        },
        "revisions": {
            "*": "Because \"rvslots\" was not specified, a legacy format has been used for the output. This format is deprecated, and in the future the new format will always be used."
        }
    },
    "query": {
        "pages": {
            "135": {
                "pageid": 135,
                "ns": 0,
                "title": "The Accessible EPUB Eco-System Overview",
                "revisions": [
                    {
                        "contentformat": "text/x-wiki",
                        "contentmodel": "wikitext",
                        "*": "==Definition of EPUB==\nThe EPUB specification is a distribution and interchange format standard for digital publications and documents which is maintained and managed by the [https://www.w3.org/publishing/ Publishing@W3C]. EPUB defines a means of representing, packaging and encoding structured and semantically enhanced content \u2014 including HTML5, CSS, SVG, images, and other resources \u2014 for distribution in a single-file format.<br>\nEPUB, widely adopted as the format for digital publications, has the ability to offer a mainstream format which is accessible for everyone.\n\n==EPUB Accessibility 1.0 Specification==\nThe [http://www.idpf.org/epub/a11y/ EPUB Accessibility] specification is structured so that there is a set of universal high-level accessibility requirements for EPUB files. It is possible to produce an EPUB file which is not accessible at all so content providers are encouraged to take advantage of the accessibility features available within this specification as a baseline requirement for their publications.\n\n==EPUB Accessibility Techniques==\nA separate [http://www.idpf.org/epub/a11y/techniques/techniques.html techniques document] identifies specific practices and how they might be implemented within the various versions of EPUB. Advisory in nature, these techniques are intended to help authors create EPUB publications that conform to the EPUB Accessibility specification.\n\n==Ace by DAISY==\n[https://inclusivepublishing.org/toolbox/accessibility-checker/ Ace by DAISY], the free open source EPUB accessibility checking tool, has been created to assist in the evaluation of conformance to the EPUB Accessibility Specification.<br>\nDesigned to assist content providers at any stage in their workflow, Ace by DAISY will make it easier to produce higher quality, more accessible EPUB content files by performing a variety of automated checks and producing a list of violations that need fixing and data visualizations to aid the manual inspection process.  Ace, by DAISY can be usable as a standalone tool, or can be integrated into productions workflows and software. \n\n==SMART \u2013 Simple Manual Accessibility Reporting Tool==\nDesigned to be used in conjunction with the Ace by DAISY the [https://inclusivepublishing.org/toolbox/ace-smart/ SMART tool] provides manual checks to ensure conformance with EPUB and WCAG requirements. SMART is available to vendors and publishers via DAISY partners and it generates a consistent and clear report.\n\n==Acessibility Knowledge Base==\nThe [http://kb.daisy.org/publishing/ Accessible Publishing Knowledge Base] provides best practices for creating accessible digital publications with a specific focus on EPUB. Easy to navigate, this directory can be used as a reference for any HTML-based format. \n\n==Conformance and Discovery==\nPeople and institutions that purchase published materials need to know about the accessibility before they purchase. Accessibility metadata defined in the EPUB Accessibility Conformance and Discovery Specification should be used with all born accessible materials. Specifically, \u201cconformsTo\u201d and \u201caccessibilitySummary\u201d are vital pieces of information needed to make a decision to purchase.<br>\n\nThe gold standard is independent third-party certification, such as Global Certified Accessible. Vendors are beginning to show the accessibility metadata, as in [https://www.vitalsource.com/en-uk/products/robertson-39-s-introduction-to-fire-prevention-mike-t-love-james-c-v9780133848960?term=9780133848960 this example] on the VitalSource platform.\n\n==Global Certified Accessible==\nThe [https://benetech.org/our-work/born-accessible/certification/ Benetech GCA] program helps publishers produce \u201cborn accessible\u201d content by evaluating files and providing an in-depth report on compliance and recommendations for improved accessibility strategies. Individual features are scored, and files are given a pass / fail notification. Publisher workflows and practices are also crucial to certifications and once accredited a publisher is granted an annual subscription license to auto-certify titles produced via the successful workflow.\n\n==Accessibility Testing of EPUB 3 Reading Systems== \nThe reading systems used for EPUB titles need to support accessibility. A protocol has been developed to test accessibility of EPUB 3 reading systems for a wide range of reading disabilities. The testing is conducted through a crowd sourced approach, to help reading systems developers in improving the accessibility of their products, and to help the universities, schools and end users by identifying the reading systems that work best for their accessibility needs. The fundamental target is that Reading systems should at least make the features listed in EPUB accessibility specs 1.0 accessible. The test results are published at www.epubtest.org/testsuite/accessibility/ and new testers are always welcome to sign up at https://inclusivepublishing.org/tre."
                    }
                ]
            },
            "134": {
                "pageid": 134,
                "ns": 0,
                "title": "User Stories of Inclusive Digital Reading",
                "revisions": [
                    {
                        "contentformat": "text/x-wiki",
                        "contentmodel": "wikitext",
                        "*": "==User Stories==\n===Steve===\n[[File:Steve.jpg|200px|thumb|left|A photo of Steve.]] \n<br>Steve is Director of Technology for an international charity.\n\nSteve is totally blind and is an avid reader of eBooks purchased online. He reads the books mostly though the speech on his smartphone talking incredibly fast. Sometimes he connects a braille display using Bluetooth, if he is reading a non-fiction title with tables or more complex layout. The availability of accessible eBooks has been a superb development for him, though he would like to see the ability to move around within the books improved.\n\nThe last book Steve read was \u201cGhost Boy\u201d by Martin Pistorius, which he enthusiastically recommends.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>\n\n===Anna===\n\n[[File:Anna.jpg|200px|thumb|left|A photo of Anna.]] \nAnna is chair of a London based non-profit, a professional mediator and experienced coach.\n\nBeing partially sighted from a young age, Anna has employed many strategies over the years to read print. She recounts that her nose sometimes bore the dark smudges of ink print as she held her newspaper close to her face on her daily train commute. \n\nBy choice Anna now reads audio books, but when this option is not available, she will turn to her lightweight e ink eReader. That\u2019s how she is reading \u201cThe Hidden Tools of Comedy\u201d by Steven Kaplan. Anna says that on her eReader the text can be made nice and big, the contrast is high, the fonts are clear, and her nose stays clean.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>\n\n===Holly===\n[[File:Holly.jpg|200px|thumb|left|A photo of Holly.]] <br> \nHolly is an author and works as a specialist tutor. \n\nHolly describes her reading difficulties as follows: \u201cMy dyslexia with mild binocular instability means that I read very slowly (40 wpm as opposed to (350-450), which makes reading a slow and exhausting experience. Also, the print shakes when I am tired or it is too small, so I normally have to cover up an eye or put on some blue glasses.\u201d\n\n\u201cHealing ADD\u201d by Daniel G. Amen is the eBook that Holly is currently reading. On her tablet she makes the background green, turns down the brightness, and makes the print quite large.\n\nAs well as an avid reader, Holly the author of the Defeat Dyslexia! book series for parents.<br><br><br>\n\n==Talking eBooks video==\nTo learn more from people with disabilities about the benefits of accessible eBooks, there is a 2-minute [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riqmYsOAEiQ video here]\n\n==Prevalence of Reading Disabilities in the US==\nAccording to the 2010 census, about 8.1 million people in the US have difficulty seeing, including 2 million people who are blind.<br>\nBrault, Matthew W., United States Economics and Statistics Administration, United States Bureau of the Census. \"Americans with disabilities: 2010.\" Current population reports. no. 131 (2012). Retrieved from:\nhttps://www2.census.gov/library/publications/2012/demo/p70-131.pdf\n\nIt is estimated that as many as 43 million US citizens have dyslexia. Slightly more than 2 million children are receiving special educational services for a reading disorder.\nhttp://www.ldonline.org/article/10784/"
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }
}